FI Runner Up, Mrs. Howell’s Spicy Side

Posted by TraderTiki on October 7th, 2008 — Posted in Drinks, Events, Recipes, Rum, Tiki Drinks

The fourth and final runner up of the Forbidden Island Cocktail Contest, Mrs. Howell’s Spicy Side, by JenTiki! This drink is on the menu at Forbidden Island from now through November!  This one’s a sweet little number I like to think of as the best spicy lemonade I’ve ever had.  Truly, so the saying goes, eminently quaffable. Cheers to the runner up!

Mrs Howells Spicy Side

Mrs. Howell’s Spicy Side

  • 1 1/2 oz White Puerto Rican Rum (Sub Cruzan Light)
  • 3/4 oz Spiced Rum (Cpt. Morgan at the request of JenTiki)
  • 1 oz Orange Curacao
  • 3/4 oz Lemon Juice
  • 1/2 oz Ginger syrup
  • 1/4 oz St. Elizabeth Allspice Dram
  • 1/4 oz Orgeat

Shake the hell out of it, and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a flamed lemon peel and paper parasol.


Maluna Hai, created for TDN

Posted by TraderTiki on September 18th, 2008 — Posted in Drinks, Original Drinks, Recipes, Tiki Drinks

Developed this very evening at the Upstairs bar. Come and join us in the chat!

Maluna Hai

Maluna Hai

  • 1 1/2 El Dorado 12 year (sub Lemon Hart 80)
  • 1 oz Grapefruit Juice (1:1 white to red, if available)
  • 1/2 oz Lime Juice
  • 1/2 oz Orgeat
  • 1/4 oz St. Elizabeth Allspice Dram
  • 1/4 oz Gomme Syrup
  • dash Grand Marnier
  • dash Angostura Bitters

Shake like hell with crushed ice and pour into Goblet.

Make one, shake one, drink one tonight at the Mixoloseum Chat!


MxMo 19th Century, The Japanese Cocktail

Posted by TraderTiki on September 14th, 2008 — Posted in Bitters, Brandy, Classic Cocktails, Drinks, MxMo, Recipes

Many thanks to this Mixology Monday’s hosts at Bibulo.us, sending us back in time (and into the library) for some 19th Century Cocktails!

As read in Imbibe! by David Wondrich, in 1860, diplomats from Japan made a few weeks stay in New York City.  While there, they stayed at the Metropolitan hotel, about a block away from Jerry Thomas’ Palace bar.  The likelihood of the legation stopping in was about 100%, given their penchant for cocktails, and The Professor’s renown.

Created to commemorate this occasion was the Japanese Cocktail.  A tender and delicious little concoction of Orgeat, Brandy, and Bitters.

Text not available

Somehow, years later in Harry Johnson’s Bartender’s Manual (1934 edition), the recipe changed dramatically.   This version adds a good dallop of shaved ice and Maraschino Liqueur, and replaces the Brandy with Eau Celeste (Himmels Wasser), which in searches shows as a sort of plant fungicide.

Harry Johnsons Bartenders Manual, the Japanese Cocktail

Seeing as I don’t appear to have a ready supply of large quantities of Copper Sulfate, Ammonia, and whatever the heck Sal Soda is to make the eau celeste, I think we’re going to have to go with the original good Professor’s recipe, adapted by David Wondrich, with some further adaptation of technique.

Japanese Cocktail

Japanese Cocktail

  • 1 Tbsp Orgeat
  • 1/2 tsp Bogart’s Bitters (sub Fees or homemade Boker’s)
  • 2 oz of Brandy

Stir with Ice, strain into champagne saucer.  Garnish with 1 or 2 twists of Lemon Peel.

It’s a delightful and creamy little bite of a drink.  The large amount of Bitters adds a lot of flavor, making a sort of mulled Brandy, while the Orgeat balances out the harsher notes in the bitters and any burn in the brandy.  Daniel at Teardrop Lounge made a lovely variation with Filbert Orgeat and Barsol Pisco, garnished with shredded chocolate.

I can’t recommend this drink enough.  It’s easy to concoct, and extremely pleasing to just about any palate.  Drink and enjoy!


Orgeat

Posted by TraderTiki on September 14th, 2008 — Posted in Concoctioneering, Recipes, Trader Vic

Orgeat, fashionably French soda sweetener, or one of the best ingredients ever set behind the bar?

First, for a quick peek at how to properly pronounce the word, see this pic by Humuhumu from Martin’s recent presentation on the subject.

Here is a classic recipe from 1835.  It’s quite a bit simplified, and I’ve got a bit more detailed modern method below it, with plenty of pictures.

Text not available

Orgeat has been around since somewhere around the dawn of time.  Originally a barley based syrup flavored with almonds, eventually the barley was ditched for the far more flavorful, but still oily and wonderful almonds.  Most of the commercial product is made as almond flavored syrup, and can be purchased from Fees, Torani, and Monin.  They all just have a bit of something missing though, and the effort to make real orgeat is well rewarded with some of the best flavors possible.  Real Orgeat, as made below, is a thing of beauty.  It is an aromatic enhancer with rose and orange flower water, and acts not to purely sweeten the drink, but really changes the profile to something entirely different, neutralizing a lot of the bitter and sour flavors.  It’s what made the Mai Tai, so there’s gotta be something to it!

The origin of the below recipe comes from the fxcuisine recipe, such as Erik used, but I’ve done a few twists here and there for my own purposes, mostly in measuring by volume.

I’m not going to push too heavily that you should blanch and chop your own almonds, but it seems to give it just a little bit more flavor and texture.  There’s something about that fresh oil just under the skin of the almond that works wonders.

The following recipe yields around 1/2 gallon

You will need:

  • 1/2 lb. blanched whole almonds
  • (approximately) 3 Quarts Sugar
  • 1 Quarts Water
  • Bitter Almond Extract
  • Rose Water
  • Orange Flower Water
Almonds for Orgeat Almonds Blanching for making Orgeat
To blanch the almonds, set the almonds in a large bowl.  Bring 3 cups of water to a boil, then cover the almonds with the boiling water.  After 2 minutes, strain the almonds from the water, return the almonds to the bowl, then cover the almonds with cold water.  The almonds should now slide easily from their skins. Almonds blanched
Almonds chopped Roughly chop the whole almonds.  A food processor at a low speed is highly recommended.

Add the roughly chopped almonds, and pour an equal amount of sugar to almonds (by volume) into a large pot.

Add 1 quarts water to the pot and bring to a boil.

One it has hit boiling, take the pot off of heat, and leave to rest for 12 hours or overnight.

After 12 hours, strain the liquid through a cheesecloth.  Repeat a few times if greater clarity is desired.  Me, I strain it once as I like to preserve a bit of the almond powder for each bottle, but to each their own.

Orgeat - Almond Milk

Measure the strained liquid by volume.  Add sugar in a 3:2 ratio the strained liquid (for example, 16 oz of strained liquid would require 24 oz of sugar). Put the pot on a low heat to carefully dissolve the sugar.

DO NOT let the mixture BOIL.  You’ll ruin the batch and give yourself one helluva cleaning job for the pot.  Like I recommend for any syrup, a combination of agitation, low heat, and an alert cook in the kitchen should do just fine.

Once the sugar is dissolved, and no more granules are present, remove the pot from heat.

Finalizing Orgeat

Leave to cool before adding the extra flavorings. Just a few drops, 3-6 each, of bitter almond extract, rose water and orange water seem to add plenty of aromatics and flavor. If you add them while the syrup is hot, their flavor might evaporate.

Bottling Orgeat Bottling Orgeat, part 2

This makes a big batch of Orgeat, somewhere around 1/2 gallon.  Hit up your local brewing supply (mine is F. H. Steinbart) for a case of 375 mLs with twist on caps.  A case of one dozen usually costs you just under a dollar per bottle, and it makes a great hand out once your friends are hooked on Mai Tais and Japanese made with the real deal.

Orgeat bottled

Real orgeat syrup will split after a few days in a thick, solid white layer of almond powder on top and syrup below. This is normal and happens with real orgeat syrup, all you need is insert a skewer in the bottle to break the top layer a bit, close and shake.

If you’ve made the above recipe one too many times, you can try varying it here and there.  For example, try using natural cane sugar, such as Zulka, for a bit of a richer flavor.  Just be sure to give it a turn in the food processor so it dissolves easier.  I recently took some Cane Sugar I had mixed some Vanilla Beans in and made a rich Vanilla Cane Orgeat, which is getting a good reputation as Liquid Heaven.